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Song Parodies -> "Curação"

Original Song Title:

"Yesterday"

Original Performer:

The Beatles

Parody Song Title:

"Curação"

Parody Written by:

Susanna Viljanen

The Lyrics

Curação -
That sounds strangely like the French somehow
Or is it Portuguese, so do you know
on how to pronounce "Curação" ?

Jyväskylä?
Is it somewhere near Unadilla?
Or just another strange map-filler?
Now where the heck is Jyväskylä?

Where do all these names come from, I cannot tell
Makes sense in their own language but they are hard to spell

Järfalla -
Recall it is quite close to Solvalla
But not in vicinity of Malla
So can you locate Järfalla?

Where do all these names come from, I cannot tell
Makes sense in their own language but they are hard to spell

Magyarórszag?
Now I really have to say "Oh gawk!"
Hungary is just a better mark
for land with name Magyarórszag

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Pacing: 4.7
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Overall Rating: 4.7

Total Votes: 6

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John Barry - October 02, 2004 - Report this comment
Funny and informative.
Diddims - October 02, 2004 - Report this comment
Ceart gu leòr, tha seo drùidhteach! Nì rudan seo ciall 'nam cànanan màthaireile, ach cha dean iad ciall sa' Bheurla! Ro-dhona!
Shiek Of The Mutilated - October 02, 2004 - Report this comment
I'm still stuck on Massachutsetts.
2Eagle - October 02, 2004 - Report this comment
Good grief! How do people learn to spell that way? Now how much do know Hebrew?
Susanna Viljanen - October 03, 2004 - Report this comment
Okay, the answers are:
1) "Curação" is Portuguese, and it is pronounced like "koo-russ-augh"
2) "Jyväskylä" is a town in Central Finland, pronounced roughly like "you-vass-kyou-la"
3) "Järfalla" is a suburb of Stockholm, Sweden. "Solvalla" is near Stockholm as well, but "Malla" is a mountain in Lapland. "Järfalla" is pronounced rougly "yer-fall-ah"
4) This is my favourite. The own language name of Hungary. It is pronounced roughly "mud-yaar-or-sug".
Phil Alexander - October 03, 2004 - Report this comment
Don't tell me, you were just itching to get a verse in for Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch ;-)
Susanna Viljanen - October 03, 2004 - Report this comment
Nope Phil, I was thinking about Czesztochowa - the Polish language offers, just as Cymric, an enormous amount of tongue-twisters. Portuguese is tricky in its own way; many people doesn't realize ç is always pronounced as "s". (It is there because "s" between wovels is pronounced like English z - you need to denote phomen "s" by another character. Hungarians use "sz" which is pronounced as "s".) Think about Moçambique (Mosambiki).

I have seen the name of the island of Curação misspelled as "Curacoa". I presume it has been the same typist who have turned the queen Boudicca (original spelling) into Boadicea - somewhat a snaky name, if I am to be asked.
Phil Alexander - October 03, 2004 - Report this comment
I have the occasional Polish phrase, so I know what you mean.. and I learned my first Slovak a few weeks ago, too (which I'd better not repeat in polite company ;-) )

But I think you'll find "Boadicea" is simply how the Romans wrote the name that would have been pronounced the same way - it's a relatively recent softening of the "c" (incidentally, I've done a parody about her, too: http://www.amiright.com/parody/misc/traditional199.shtml)
Diddims - October 03, 2004 - Report this comment
There sure is confusion with pronunciation, isn't there? Try Gaelic, for instance: c and g are always hard, as in "Catherine" and "Gwenivere", never as in "Cecelia" and "Genevive"; ch is as is "loch" or "bach", and gh is almost the same, sort of like "groan" with a slight gargle on the g, unless it is before or after e or i, then it sounds like "y", as in "yell"; bh and mh are pronounced "v" as in "van", unless in the middle of a word, they're silent; d before or after an e or i is pronouced "j" as in "jet", s is pronounced "sh" with the same vowels, as in "sheet", the same with t, pronouced "ch" as in "cherry"; Eu is pronounced "ay", as in "hay"; ao is tricky. It's sort of between "ee" and "oo". Try hors d'ouevre, or saying "cool" without rounding the lips; adh/eadh/agh/eagh are pronounced something like "Bert", that "uh" sound, as if you were saying the last a in "Maria". And all stress falls on the first syllable. It's tricky, isn't it? A bheil thu a' tuigsinn idir, no a bheil mi 'g ràdh gu leòr? Tha mo theanga lùbachta le h-uile dhe! An urrainn dhuibh gu soilleir smaoineachadh? Chan urrainn dhomh!
Susanna Viljanen - October 03, 2004 - Report this comment
diddims, since my first language isn't English but Finnish, that is actually easy - just need to remember the rules. It is pretty same as in Cymric, where also "ll" is pronounced like "hl" - "Lloyd" becoming "hlwid". ["Floyd" is more close to original pronounciation than "Lloyd".] What you described, adh/eadh/agh/eagh is pretty much the same phonem as Finnish "ö".

Tolkien formed Quenya after Finnish and Sindarin after Cymric.

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