Making fun of music, one song at a time. Since the year 2000.
Check out the two amIright misheard lyrics books including one book devoted to misheard lyrics of the 1980s.
(Toggle Right Side Navigation)

Misheard Song Lyrics -> Stories -> The Moody Blues

Misheard lyrics (also called mondegreens) occur when people misunderstand the lyrics in a song. These are NOT intentional rephrasing of lyrics, which is called parody. For more information about the misheard lyrics available on this site, please read our FAQ.

This page contains a list of the songs that have stories about their misheard lyrics submitted.

Song names are sorted by first letter, excluding A and The. This is sorted by song title only, not by song title and performer. So if two different performers preformed the same song, you'll see misheard lyrics for both on the same page (provided the song title was spelt the same both times, and misheard lyrics have been submitted for both!).


Days of Future Passed album at Amazon.com
The Moody Blues', "Floating"
The Misheard Lyrics:
Colliding around with your feet on the ground
The Real Lyrics:
Gliding around get your feet off the ground
The Story: This is a song about floating in space. I thought "colliding around with your feet on the ground" was a contrast with how it would be to be floating. - Submitted by: Joyce Calderone
The Moody Blues', "For My Lady"
The Misheard Lyrics:
Oh I'd give my life so lightly
For my dead, cold lady
The Real Lyrics:
Oh I'd give my life so lightly
For my gen--tle-- lady
The Story: I knew that this song was not about necrophilia, but that's what the lyrics sounded like to me for years. - Submitted by: The Vast Right Wing Conspiracy
The Moody Blues', "Have You Heard"
The Misheard Lyrics:
Scattered Guernseys in the fields
The Real Lyrics:
Scatter good seed in the fields.
The Story: Since the 1970s I thought the lyrics were "scattered curtsies in the fields" and today realized it must actually be "scattered Guernseys in the fields" because curtsies in fields doesn't make sense, but cows in the fields does. Well, when I checked the lyrics to submit to amiright.com I found out the correct lyrics are "scatter good seed in the fields". I give up! - Submitted by: Joyce Calderone
The Moody Blues', "Lost in a Lost World"
The Misheard Lyrics:
Children from a family tree that's longer than a century
The Real Lyrics:
Children of a family tree that's longer than a centipede
The Story: One of my friends is obsessed with centipedes. We actually made a bet over this lyric. I thought for sure it was "century", it even sounded like he said it! Then one night my friend called me up and said, "Look up 'Lost in a Lost World' lyrics," to my shock and horror, it was centipede. What the hell does "longer than a centipede" even mean?! "Longer than a century" makes more sense and it even rhymes better! CURSE YOU JOHN LODGE!!!!!!!! - Submitted by: Thaddeus Gammelthorpe
The Moody Blues', "Nights in White Satin"
The Misheard Lyrics:
Just like the truth is.
I can't say any more.
'Cause I love you.
Yes, I love you.
Oh, I love you.
The Real Lyrics:
Just what the truth is.
I can't say any more.
'Cause I love you.
Yes, I love you.
Oh, how I love you.
The Story: Finally, the song itself I posting here. With their orchestral formula, they are best known for having influence to other artists. For the lyrical content of this song, band member Justin Hayward wrote the last line of choruses as "Oh, how I love you" indicated that how Justin fell in love with a woman. However, when I hear this song, Justin doesn't sing "How" but jumping into the love letters as "Oh, I love you" indicated that Justin now fell in love with a woman. About this song: "Nights in White Satin" is a part of track #7, "The Night", featured on their second studio album, "Days of Future Passed", released on 10 November 1967. "Nights in White Satin" was written by Justin Hayward while the poem, "Late Lament", was written by Peter Knight and Graeme Edge and narrated by Mike Pinder. With its fusion of orchestral and rock elements, "Nights in White Satin" was one of the first progressive rock song ever to reaching the Top 20 internationally. When first released in 1967, this song reaching #19 on the UK Singles Chart and #103 on Billboard's Pop Chart in 1967. It was the first significant chart entry by the team since "Go Now" and its recent lineup change, in which Denny Laine had resigned and both Justin and John Lodge had joined. Upon its 1972 re-release, "Nights in White Satin" topping Cash Box's Pop Chart and Canada chart. The power ballad also reaching #2 on Billboard's Pop Chart and #8 on Australia chart. In the wake of its international success, this song charting again on the UK Singles Chart in late 1972 and climbing to #9. This song was released yet again in 1979, and charting for a third time on the UK Singles Chart, reaching #14. Since its success, this song was later covered by many artists. This song is also notable for its spoken-word poem, "Late Lament", narrated by keyboardist, Mike Pinder. The end of this song was ending coldly instead of fade-out with Mike Pinder playing gong at around 7 minutes and 5 seconds and lasting at 7 minutes and 38 seconds. - Submitted by: Wisnu Aji
The Moody Blues', "Your Wildest Dreams"
The Misheard Lyrics:
In your wild Irish dreams
The Real Lyrics:
In your wildest dreams
The Story: I was so sure I was right, and thought it was a great lyric--so poetic. I sang it at a party and everyone laughed! - Submitted by: Brenda Coven
Indexes: [#] [A] [B] [C] [D] [E] [F] [G] [H] [I] [J] [K] [L] [M] [N] [O] [P] [Q] [R] [S] [T] [U] [V] [W] [Y] [Z]

New entries in this section are currently reviewed by Brian Kelly. Previous editors (if any) are listed on the editors page.

Submissions!

Would you like to Submit some Misheard Lyrics for a song We're always looking for more entries.

Disclaimer

Disclaimer: amIright.com makes no claims to the accuracy of the correct lyrics. All correct lyrics are copyrighted, amIright.com does not claim ownership of the original lyrics.